Green Products

Green Products

A compilation of green products, ideas, and best practices for residential builders and remodelers.



Features
November 08, 2010
Features
November 08, 2010
Features
November 08, 2010
Features
December 05, 2010

NAHB Research Center’s latest study identifies wall assemblies that perform the best in mixed-humid climates, such as Washington, D.C., Nashville, and Cincinnati. The claddings used in the study include traditional stucco, fiber-cement siding, brick veneer, manufactured stone, vinyl siding, and insulated vinyl siding.

Features
December 05, 2010

When it comes to specifying and selling green, high-performance products in the new-home building market, energy-efficient systems and building envelope upgrades, such as high-performance windows and air-sealing packages, are in highest demand by home builders and buyers, according to a October 2010 survey of Professional Builder readers.

Features
December 19, 2010

By eliminating waste in the home building product and process, builders can negate the added costs for going green, writes Lean building guru Scott Sedam in his latest column.

Features
November 07, 2010

Working with structural insulated panels has its challenges, especially for first-time users. To help shed some light on the common problem areas, we’ve asked a SIPs expert to provide key tips and do’s and don’ts when working with the technology.

News
November 05, 2010

A new study from environmental marketing agency TerraChoice found that 95 percent of green claims on home and family products were misleading. Of nearly 5,300 products reviewed, only about 240 were considered “sin free” when it comes to environmentally-friendly claims.

Features
October 20, 2010

It’s good to be green, but everything starts with affordability. That’s what home builders have learned about creating marketable products for cost-conscious, savvy buyers. Solar panels and tankless water heaters are attractive options, but achieving green at an affordable price requires getting back to basics: using land economically, reducing waste, making the most of smaller square footage, and keeping operating costs to a minimum.

Features
February 14, 2011

There are a number of reasons builders might make the decision to switch building products, materials, or systems. A different product may offer first-cost or labor savings over your current product. Or perhaps it will make your homes more energy efficient or green, and thus more marketable to potential buyers. Regardless of the reason, switching products does pose risks and challenges for builders.

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