Integrating biophilic design into the built environment could be a future trend

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Low-environmental-impact design and biophilic design principles must work together to help connect the physical environment with nature.

September 04, 2012

Low-environmental-impact design and biophilic design principles must work together to help connect the physical environment with nature. "By ignoring the human need to connect with nature and place, low-impact designs are often experientially and aesthetically deficient," says Stephen Kellert, professor emeritus at Yale University, who developed a set of biophilic standards based on six elements and dozens of attributes.

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