Land Development



Features
March 01, 2006

Fifteen years after Hurricane Andrew, the temporary FEMA trailers that were put in place are still being used for housing. No matter how we strive, no matter how much we tear down and replace, no matter how we Americans fall passionately in love with the new and updated, we still end up with a built environment pockmarked by ugly temporary housing.

Features
February 01, 2006

High-rise and mid-rise construction used to be a high stakes game for regional builders with plenty of coastline. Now, however, even the biggest national builders want a place at the table. Their timing -- always a staple of their success -- couldn't be better. 

Features
February 01, 2006

Since the GIs came home from World War II, this country's high-production home builders have had one dominant product: single-family homes built in subdivisions at about four units to the acre. Repeating that product, over and over, allowed the biggest builders to evolve into mass-production machines.

Features
February 01, 2006

This month, we feature two Southern markets that rank among the 13 largest in the country.

Features
January 01, 2006

As you enter the lower 9th Ward of New Orleans, the smell hits you right away — the sick smell of death. Spend a few seconds inside one of these empty, desolate homes, filled with rotting couches, walls consumed by mold — and the smell will turn your stomach. A breeze carries a shard of aluminum flashing into the street.

Features
January 01, 2006

Move over, metropolitan markets, the megapolitans are coming. Estimating housing needs for 83 million more U.S. residents by 2040, researchers at the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech are predicting a $25-trillion housing boom. To account for this growth and development, they have created 10 super-sized market areas they call megapolitan areas, or simply megapolitans.

Features
December 01, 2005

In this article, we will discuss organization business structures and selecting a lender. Business Structures After determining the goals of the project and the approximate amount of financing needed, you must decide on the legal structure of your business. You should make your decision based on the impact of the legal structure on your liability, initial cost, government control, impact on inc...

Features
November 01, 2005

The majority of real estate developers look to increase their potential investment return by using other people's money. Assuming that the rate of return for the project is greater than the interest rate for the debt, the more debt placed on a property, the higher the potential return. The use of borrowed capital to make an investment, called leveraging, does not always guarantee a return.

Features
November 01, 2005

A mid-August poll published in USA Today indicated 71 percent of respondents would accept a tax hike to keep developers away from their property. I don't know who asked the survey question, nor do I know how it was asked, but I'd like to see the details. I know I could blow huge holes in it.

News
October 01, 2005

In last month's article, we discussed the process of finding land to develop as well as how to conduct the preliminary investigation and financial analysis. This article will discuss tying up the land, due diligence and financing. Tying Up Land Once you've identified a parcel of land and completed the preliminary investigation, you'll need to tie up the land until you are ready to acquire it.

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