Moving Down in Connecticut

Printer-friendly versionSend by email

In Simsbury, Conn., just northwest of Hartford, a 31-unit cluster development called Summerfield in attracting empty nesters and retirees in search of low-maintenance living.

May 01, 1999

In Simsbury, Conn., just northwest of Hartford, a 31-unit cluster development called Summerfield is attracting empty nesters and retirees in search of low-maintenance living.

Rosewood model at Summerfield is 1840 square feet and base-priced at $219,900. With such upgrades as a finished walkout basement, it sells for $290,000. Photography by David Todd.

According to Chris Nelson, president of Nelson Conyers Homes, Manchester, buyers are primarily working couples whose children have just left the nest. The community also appeals to singles, relocating buyers and snowbirds. The age range is from the 40s to nearly 70.

Nelson is building single-family homes at Summerfield ranging from 1650 to 2360 square feet and base-priced from $199,900 to $257,900. A single model opened last spring and to date, 18 houses have been sold. The property is being developed by Landworks, a partnership between Nelson and Ron Janeczko.

Because of the cluster zoning, most of the homes have only one bedroom, which has held down the number of children moving in, Nelson says. All master bedrooms are on the first floor, with a loft/study and full bath upstairs.

"A lot of these people are in their 40s and 50s and know what they want," he says. "Many are divorced. There aren’t too many housing options for them in this area, and they don’t want the maintenance, so they like this project."

Summerfield is a condominium development; homeowners pay a fee for exterior maintenance, snow removal and lawn care. The cottage-style homes were designed by Jack Kemper of Kemper Associates Architects, Farmington.

Also See:

Coming of Age

Comments on: "Moving Down in Connecticut"

October 2014

This Month in Professional Builder

Products

QuickDraw keyless remote access for truck boxes offers push button access from up to 100 feet away and keyless unlocking within 5 feet of the truck box.

Features

Builders prefer traditional approaches for market research, according to a survey of Professional Builder readers. 

Email Subscriptions