New wall bracing method provides design flexibility, simpler code compliance

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APA – The Engineered Wood Association has published APA System Report SR-102, which details a simplified wall bracing method using continuous wood structural panel sheathing. The report provides building officials, builders, and designers with a new approach and technical information for bracing the walls of single-family houses.

September 17, 2012

APA – The Engineered Wood Association has published APA System Report SR-102, which details a simplified wall bracing method using continuous wood structural panel sheathing.

The report provides building officials, builders, and designers with a new approach and technical information for bracing the walls of single-family houses. The method applies to homes in areas of low wind and seismicity and provides flexibility for building design and construction.

APA enhanced the 2012 International Residential Code simplified bracing wall provisions to apply to a larger percentage of homes. The simplified method calls for continuously sheathed wood structural panel bracing with a sheathing thickness of 7/16 of an inch, a larger nail (8d), and a nailing schedule of 4 inches, closer than the previous provision.

“APA’s objective was to further streamline the simplified wall bracing provisions in the 2012 IRC and develop a method that would be easier for builders and designers to apply. We also recognized the need for more design flexibility in the placement of braced wall lines around window and door openings,” explained Dr. BJ Yeh, P.E., APA’s technical services director.

For more information about APA’s Simplified Wall Bracing Method and to download the full report, go to www.performancewalls.org.

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