Scratch the Neighbors' Backs

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Successful infill development often requires more than just an intricate knowledge of the surrounding area. Existing neighbors need to feel as though they, too, have a stake in the new project.

March 01, 2002

 

Art, pottery and furniture from a San Diego commercial district were used in a cross-marketing arrangement to promote this 72-unit townhome development for The Olson Co.

Successful infill development often requires more than just an intricate knowledge of the surrounding area. Existing neighbors need to feel as though they, too, have a stake in the new project.

One way infill pacesetter The Olson Co. of San Diego accomplishes this, says marketing director Lenette Hewitt, is through cross-marketing. For Artisan Walk, a 106-unit community of detached homes in Brea, Calif., Olson purchased $500 worth of hors d’oeuvres for a local artist’s gallery opening. In return, Olson was allowed to display pre-sales literature.

At Village Walk, a 72-unit townhome development in the Little Italy section of San Diego, Olson’s models were decorated with items from local stores, with signs directing home shoppers to the stores for more information about the displayed artwork, pottery or furniture. In return, those stores posted signs promoting the townhomes. Though many factors contributed to Village Walk’s success, 63 of the 72 units were sold before the first buyer moved in.

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