Conservation Strategy Pays

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Waukesha, Wis.-based Bielinski Homes is making some changes, but the builder remains committed to conservation development.

July 01, 2004

 

Waukesha, Wis.-based Bielinski Homes is making some changes, but the builder remains committed to conservation development. The company's low-impact, compact/cluster land strategy maximizes open space, uses natural water management techniques and favors native vegetation.

Larry Gruber, promoted to CEO in late May, will shift the company's focus from land acquisition to construction to capitalize on the 11,000-acre land position former CEO Bob Brownell, now co-chairman, left him. But Gruber says Bielinski Homes will remain "heavily involved" with conservation development, which underlies roughly 70 percent of its projects.

Jack Broughton, director of environmental policy, says the strategy saves Bielinski between 25 to 30 percent on development costs, which include grading, paving, concrete work, water and landscaping. For example, in contrast to concrete sewage systems, natural bioswales cost less to install, reduce maintenance needs, reduce the volume of water released downstream, and provide natural treatment by absorbing nitrogen, phosphorus, suspended solids and other substances.

For more information and a presentation, follow the conservation development links at www.bielinski.com. To read more about Gruber's strategy, go to The Last Word.

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