Seventy percent of voters oppose mortgage interest tax deduction repeal, survey shows

Printer-friendly version

According to a national survey sponsored by the American Institute of Architects (AIA), nearly 70 percent of voters oppose repealing the mortgage interest tax deduction to cut the federal deficit. 

October 24, 2012

According to a national survey sponsored by the American Institute of Architects (AIA), nearly 70 percent of voters oppose repealing the mortgage interest tax deduction to cut the federal deficit.

“These findings affirm strong support by Americans for the mortgage interest deduction—one of the most popular paths to owning a home,” said AIA President Jeff Potter, FAIA. “The poll also underscores heavy, bipartisan support of continued tax incentives for energy efficiency. Both of these issues are expected to figure prominently in post-election Congressional tax battles.”

In addition, 71 percent of voters favor extending the tax incentive for making houses and commercial buildings more energy efficient, according to the survey.

The survey, which was conducted Oct. 2 through 4 by Clarus Resarch Group of Washington D.C., also found that 64 percent of voters believe the government should invest in energy efficiency if such an investment would result in lower utility bills over the next ten years. Seventy percent of voters surveyed would like to see federal income tax laws changed to allow homeowners to deduct losses when they sell a home for less than they paid for it.

For the full release, click here

Comments on: "Seventy percent of voters oppose mortgage interest tax deduction repeal, survey shows"

August 2017

This Month in Professional Builder

Products
Features
Overlay Init