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Homeowners Can Talk to Their Homes with New Amazon Device

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Homeowners Can Talk to Their Homes with New Amazon Device

Homeowners with hands covered in flour in the kitchen can ask Amazon Echo’s Alexa to brighten the lights


July 15, 2015
Alexa

A plethora of devices that make a home smarter have already hit the market, from cover plates to connected garage doors to musical light bulbs. The Washington Post covers two devices that just hit the market.

One of the products reviewed is Amazon Echo, which the Washington Post refers to as an “entertainment-information device.” The device goes by the name of Alexa, and it functions similar to the Siri of Apple products or OK Google, where a system will do tasks or answer questions based on voice command. You can ask “Alexa, how is the weather today?” or “Alexa, play jazz music,” and the system will do the work.

“We feel that this device might be best used in the kitchen, which is where we’ve put ours,” The Washington Post contends. “If your hands are full and you’re working on other things, you can talk to this device. Tell it what you want. Ask it questions. Want to know the time or the weather? Alexa will tell you.”

The frequent launch of new smart-home devices reflect increasing demand from buyers who want a smarter, connected home.

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