Currently Reading

Pandemic Precautions for Home Builders: Keep or Purge?

Advertisement
Coronavirus Resources and Information

Pandemic Precautions for Home Builders: Keep or Purge?

Home builders appear ready to purge much of what they’ve done during the last 21 months or so, whether because they can or they no longer feel the need to keep them


January 6, 2022
Purge piles of items to keep, donate, discard
Photo: Andrey Popov | stock.adobe.com
This article first appeared in the January 2022 issue of Pro Builder.

Around this time every year (well, most years), I dedicate myself to purging stuff I no longer use, wear, or need. My general motto is, for every gift I receive for the holidays or otherwise, something I already have needs to go—ideally in the recycling or donation bin. The goal is to at least maintain the level of clutter in and around our house, and especially in my home office ... and even more so given how much time I have spent there these past several months. I get a little twitchy when the walls start closing in.

That process is even more poignant this year as I consider the results of a recent study of more than 300 home builders Pro Builder conducted with Home Innovation Research Labs. Simply, we wanted to know which of the COVID-required or -initiated practices builders took up in the early months of the pandemic will remain as restrictions relax and the industry returns to a version of pre-virus normalcy.


RELATED


Like my personal ritual, home builders appear ready to purge a good portion of what they’ve done in the last 21 months or so, whether because they can or they no longer feel the need to keep them.

Case in point: 62% of builders reported adopting virus-mitigating practices on their jobsites to help “flatten the curve,” while 49% said they took similar measures in their design centers and sales offices. Coming out of COVID, only 21% will maintain those practices on jobsites and just 17% will do so in their facilities.

On the flip side, and not surprisingly, the majority of builders that expanded their stable of suppliers due to pandemic-driven supply chain issues and materials price volatility don’t expect to scale back when those crises abate.

62% of builders reported adopting virus-mitigating practices on their jobsites to help “flatten the curve.” Coming out of COVID, only 21% say they will maintain those practices on jobsites.

As for their products, much of what consumers demanded of homes (and what new-home builders were uniquely able to deliver) to meet changing lifestyle needs is likely to remain, including a greater emphasis on indoor air quality and occupant health, floor plans with at least one dedicated office (and likely another), spaces for remote learning, and more and bigger outdoor living areas—results validated by other recent industry and consumer studies I’ve seen.

And while fewer than one-third of the builders surveyed initially adopted measures such as remote or work-from-home options for their employees, video conferencing among internal staff, better pay and working conditions to retain their people, and skilled labor recruitment and training, those that did integrate those practices and policies are likely to retain them going forward.

Of course, the decision to keep or purge is up to each builder and is far more complex than deciding whether that ratty college sweatshirt deserves another year in the closet. I only ask that you consider whether now is actually the right the time to let go of the stuff that got you through the pandemic.

 

Written By
Editorial Director

Rich Binsacca is editorial director of Pro Builder Media, Custom Builder, and PRODUCTS. He has reported and written about all aspects of the housing industry since 1987 and most recently was editor-in-chief of Pro Builder Media. [email protected]

 

Related Stories

Market Data + Trends

Sustainably Increasing the Homeownership Rate May Be More Difficult Than Ever Post-Pandemic

The U.S. homeownership rate has stayed the same for half a century, but housing-related fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic could change that

New-Home Sales

How Omicron Could Affect Homebuying in 2022

Even a new infectious variant can’t slow demand in a record-breaking housing market

Market Data + Trends

2021 Census Data Reveals Historically Small Population Gains

The US population grew at its slowest pace in recorded history during the COVID pandemic

Advertisement
Advertisement

More in Category




Advertisement
Advertisement

Create an account

By creating an account, you agree to Pro Builder's terms of service and privacy policy.


Daily Feed Newsletter

Get Pro Builder in your inbox

Each day, Pro Builder's editors assemble the latest breaking industry news, hottest trends, and most relevant research, delivered to your inbox.

Save the stories you care about

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet lorem ipsum dolor sit amet lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.

The bookmark icon allows you to save any story to your account to read it later
Tap it once to save, and tap it again to unsave

It looks like you’re using an ad-blocker!

Pro Builder is an advertisting supported site and we noticed you have ad-blocking enabled in your browser. There are two ways you can keep reading:

Disable your ad-blocker
Disable now
Subscribe to Pro Builder
Subscribe
Already a member? Sign in
Become a Member

Subscribe to Pro Builder for unlimited access

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.