The Dying Art of Bricklaying Makes Comeback in Luxury Buildings

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November 24, 2015

The New York Times covers a renaissance of bricklaying that development firm DDG is trying to spark.

“Each brick has a fingerprint,” Joe McMillan, chief executive and co-founder of DDG tells the Times. The fingerprints he speaks of are literal—each brick was pressed from a wooden mold by an actual person in a small seaside town in Denmark, where bricks have been made by the Petersen brick company using this method  since 1791.

The development firm, whose design and construction endeavors are done in-house, used these bricks for a boutique TriBeCa loft building, as well as a 521-foot tower on the Upper East Side.

“I think we’re finally over the stripped-down modernist boxes, and we’re searching for something with more intrinsic value,” Peter Guthrie, DDG’s head of design and construction, told the Times.

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