flexiblefullpage - default
Currently Reading

Back to Basics: 4 Strategies to Prevent Nail Pops

Advertisement
billboard - default
Construction Quality

Back to Basics: 4 Strategies to Prevent Nail Pops

APA - The Engineered Wood Association introduces the third article in its Builder Tips series of publications


By APA - The Engineered Wood Association April 4, 2014
Nail pop example

Nail “pop,” or “backout,” is a fairly common occurrence on jobsites. This protrusion of nail heads above the surface sometimes happens when green (wet) lumber shrinks because of drying. The nail point stays put while the lumber shrinks along the shank, exposing the nail head (Figure 1).

Repeated wetting and drying of the wood may also cause “cumulative pop,” in which the nail backs out of the wood incrementally. Staples can also pop or backout under these conditions.

To minimize nail pops and reduce callbacks related to squeaky floors, follow these simple steps:

Step 1: Choose the correct materials
Use dry lumber or engineered wood framing such as I-joists, trusses, glulam, or structural composite lumber, which is manufactured in a dry condition. Remember that even kiln-dried lumber has enough water left in it to cause some shrinkage.

Tip 2: Select proper fastener lengths 
When attaching plywood underlayment to a subfloor (Figure 2), use nails having a length approximately equal to the total thickness of the subfloor and underlayment layers. If pneumatically driven fasteners are used, foot pressure should be applied near the fastener to ensure contact between the underlayment and subfloor. Do not overdrive or underdrive fasteners, which could result in “telegraphing” fastener or panel joint location through resilient tile or sheet flooring.

Tip 3: Select the right nails
Use of deformed-shank nails may help reduce cumulative pop. For fastening underlayment, APA recommends ring- or screw-shank nails.

Tip 4: Properly prepare the framing surface
Attach wood structural panel roof or floor sheathing to a clean, level framing surface. If framing hangers or connectors are attached to the top of supporting framing members, shims or furring strips made from wood structural panels may need to be placed between these hardware components to make the framing surface flush. Otherwise, gaps between the sheathing and framing could result in nail pops when the sheathing is subjected to construction loads or foot traffic.

This how-to article is part of the Builder Tips series of publications from APA-The Engineered Wood Association. To view more helpful strategies, visit apawood.org/buildertips.
 

Advertisement
leaderboard2 - default

Related Stories

Innovation

University of Michigan Researchers Unveil Sustainable 3D Printing Material

Researchers from the Digital Architecture Research & Technology Laboratory at Michigan State University have developed an eco-friendly 3D printing material made from sawdust

Building Materials

Construction Materials Prices Stabilize as Supply Chains Improve

Construction input prices have posted no upward movement in five months, a relief for home builders facing increased demand for new construction

Products

5th Annual Most Valuable Products Award Winners

The MVP Awards recognize the best in innovation, style, and efficiency across 16 building products categories

Advertisement
boombox1 -
Advertisement
native1 - default
halfpage2 -

More in Category

Delaware-based Schell Brothers, our 2023 Builder of the Year, brings a refreshing approach to delivering homes and measuring success with an overriding mission of happiness

NAHB Chairman's Message: In a challenging business environment for home builders, and with higher housing costs for families, the National Association of Home Builders is working to help home builders better meet the nation's housing needs

Sure there are challenges, but overall, Pro Builder's annual Housing Forecast Survey finds home builders are optimistic about the coming year

Advertisement
native2 - default
Advertisement
halfpage1 -

Create an account

By creating an account, you agree to Pro Builder's terms of service and privacy policy.


Daily Feed Newsletter

Get Pro Builder in your inbox

Each day, Pro Builder's editors assemble the latest breaking industry news, hottest trends, and most relevant research, delivered to your inbox.

Save the stories you care about

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet lorem ipsum dolor sit amet lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.

The bookmark icon allows you to save any story to your account to read it later
Tap it once to save, and tap it again to unsave

It looks like you’re using an ad-blocker!

Pro Builder is an advertisting supported site and we noticed you have ad-blocking enabled in your browser. There are two ways you can keep reading:

Disable your ad-blocker
Disable now
Subscribe to Pro Builder
Subscribe
Already a member? Sign in
Become a Member

Subscribe to Pro Builder for unlimited access

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.