Teaching Kids About Environmental Building

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A free educational program developed by the NAHB is helping elementary school students learn about the home building process, construction jobs and the environment.

September 01, 2002

A free educational program developed by the NAHB is helping elementary school students learn about the home building process, construction jobs and the environment. "Homes Of Your Own" is available in two versions for grades K-3 and 4-6.

 

Philadelphia-area builders Kevin Valenta (left), Manchester/Hall Inc., and Todd Pohlig, Pohlig Builders Inc., presented "Homes Of Your Own," at a local elementary school on Earth Day last April.

Gary Koerner, executive vice president of the HBA of Chester & Delaware Counties, says Philadelphia-area schools have been calling his association to have members come out and present the program: "In most cases, they’re looking for a tie-in with a significant event such as Earth Day or Arbor Day."

The K-3 program focuses on the environment and conservation in the home and school. The 4-6 program focuses on the process of building a home. As part of the program, an HBA member donates a seedling that the students plant on school grounds, with a builder’s help.

"Our builders are having a wonderful time doing it," says Koerner. "They have the choice of presenting a skit to the class or talking to the kids in a roundtable setting."

The NAHB provides materials for the program, including a nine-minute video, an implementation manual with a teacher’s guide and a coloring book. The materials may be presented by a teacher, a home builder or a guest representative from the HBA. Children who complete the coloring book and send a drawing of a home to NAHB receive a junior home builder certificate.

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