Don't Skimp on Small-Site Evaluations

Printer-friendly versionSend by email

Architect Ken Newberry, principal with Newberry Campa Design Studio in Houston, has a motto: 'Everyone deserves a great architectural design.'

January 01, 2004

Ken Newberry, principal with Newberry Campa Design Studio in Houston, has a motto: “Everyone deserves a great architectural design.”

“It doesn’t matter if it’s on a 50x100-square-foot lot or 9 acres,” he adds. The problem is that smaller sites don’t always get the evaluations they deserve for cost or other reasons.

Mainly a custom home designer, Newberry believes that knowing the steps of a site evaluation can help this cause.

“Let no stone go unturned,” he says.

A client interview, an initial site visit and some paperwork should produce a current survey, identify critical tree locations and account for local deed restrictions, site requirements or preservation codes applying to existing structures. Get a feel for the surrounding landscape, adjacent buildings, streets, lot orientation, drainage, utilities and power lines, and know the rules on locating them relative to driveways and construction.

Although information gathering “is something everyone should do, not everyone does,” says Newberry. For his custom clients, a site visit lasts “a couple of hours, more or less. Each site has its own issues, so it’s impossible to list every scenario for every site, for every condition.”

Comments on: "Don't Skimp on Small-Site Evaluations"

Products

In the past 12 months, building product manufacturers introduced a vast number of new products, many of which were featured in the pages of Professional Builder.

Features

Builders, designers, and architects weigh in on what they value in relationships with suppliers and which attributes would make them consider trying a new product.

Email Subscriptions