Green Projects



Features
February 01, 2008

The U.S. Green Building Council established the Green Building Certification Institute to develop and administer programs aimed at improving green building practices and standards.

Features
February 01, 2008

Every one of us faces a choice. Not just builders and architects and product manufacturers, but all Americans. All people. We have to decide if there are enough resources to support our present lifestyle.

Features
February 01, 2008

James L. Bowyer, a professor at the University of Minnesota, is challenging the science – or lack of it – behind many widely used green building programs.

Features
February 01, 2008

According to a 2007 study, half of environmental and government professionals are seeing an increased pace of brownfield redevelopment activity.

Features
January 01, 2008

Michael Chandler is a proponent of the NAHB’s green building program, while Steve Glenn firmly believes in LEED for Homes. Metaphors fly as the two builders engage in a lively discussion about the pros and cons of the two national certification programs.

Features
January 01, 2008

Professional Builder spoke to NAHB Vice President of Advocacy Bill Kilmer to find out what its top regulatory and legislative items are for the new year.

Features
September 01, 2007

The ungainly and inefficient solar roof cells of the past are just that. Solar power is now poised to take off some of the burden placed on our nation’s power grid, as Sharp’s roof modules show.

Features
September 01, 2007

What do homebuilders really think about green? What effect has it had on the marketing and sales of their homes? Is it a fad, or will it define home construction techniques for years to come? The results of Professional Builder’s green building survey sheds light on answers to these multi-faceted questions.

Features
September 01, 2007

Building green homes is growing in popularity. Six homebuilders share how their marketing efforts differentiated them from other builders.

Features
September 01, 2007

As the National Association of Home Builders and the U.S. Green Building Council argue the merits of their respective green-building programs, dozens of local variations are springing up in housing markets around the United States. At the heart of the debate is whether one organization should be allowed to set green standards for the entire country.

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